Scientific Program

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Juan Carlos Roque

Keynote: Logotherapy as a proposal treatment for addictions

Time : 10:00 AM to 10:45 AM

Biography:

Juan Carlos is founder and therapeutic director in Capfa, where he supervises future psychologist, in a clinic for people who can´t afford a private practice, also teaches Logotherapy in a University for future masters, has worked in various rehabilitation centers in Guatemala as a individual and group therapy. Worked on a protocol for public schools to identify and involve parents on the treatment of the students that were identified as consumers. Writer of the book Brillando con valor (Shine bravery).

Abstract:

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) is a physical and psycho-emotional disease that creates a dependence or need for a substance, activity or relationship, which has become a problem worldwide. Because of its geographical position, Guatemala is a point of drug trafficking, and part of it remains in the country, which has caused an epidemic. According to Seccatid (executive secretary of the commission against addictions and illicit drug trafficking) the age of onset of substance use is 13 years old, and the drugs most used in order are: tobacco, alcohol, marijuana and cocaine. Logotherapy is the psychological current known as the third school of psychotherapy in Vienna, created by Dr. Viktor Frankl, which holds that life has purpose under any circumstance. It provides an anthropological concept of man based on the three-dimensionality of man: mind, body and spirit. Logotherapy is then a response to existential emptiness and its aftermath, conformism and totalitarianism, this through meaning, which will enable the conscience for the resistance making use of the spiritual resource, human specific capacity that being healthier can serve as force of opposition to the psychophysical. (Viktor Frankl, The Suffering Man). Several investigations have validated the postulate of Frankl, showing a strong relationship between substance abuse and the meaning of life (Rahman, 2001, Noblejas de la Flor, 1997) Having goals of meaning is associated with a less consumption of substances (Lecci, MacLean, Croteau, 2002). It is important the knowledge of 12 steps for those who work with addictions, because the program is a spiritual program, and has shown very good results in the proposal of Dr. Patric Carnes in the treatment of sexual addiction, as well as the proposed Caya model by Dr. Efrén Martínez for the logotherapeutic treatment in Colombia.

Keynote Forum

Scott Stevens

Journalist, Author, USA

Keynote: Look what dragged the cat in: The rise of the opioid crisis

Time : 10:45 AM to 11:30 AM

Biography:

Stevens is a journalist, posting regularly on health and alcohol issues for online news services and is a founding influencer at the world's largest medical portal, HealthTap. Stevens blends intensive evidence-based research, wit, journalistic objectivity, blunt personal dialogue and no-nonsense business perspective in his four award-winning health and addiction books.Stevens' work has appeared on CNN, Fox, NBC, CBS, and ABC.  His first two white papers made waves as the country begins what he calls “a shift in alcohol policy and public dialogue from what people think alcohol does FOR them to what it does TO them.” The first white paper is called “Six Signs the Next 10 Years For The Alcohol Biz Will Be Like The Last 20 For Tobacco.” The second was “How Others' Alcohol Use Became Your Business: Toxin-omics.” Both were Addicted Minds exclusives in early 2016.

Abstract:

The decade of the 2010's shelled hospitals and first responders with an explosion of opioid-related illness, injury, and death. Preventable drug overdoses tallied 54,793 lives lost in 2016 – an increase of 391 percent since 1999. Accidental drug overdose deaths increased 327 percent over the same period. The majority of OD deaths (38,000) involve opioids, The drug category most frequently involved in opioid overdoses and growing at the fastest pace includes fentanyl, fentanyl analogs, and tramadol. The fentanyl category of opioids accounted for nearly half of opioid-related deaths. The dirty cat in the litter, heroin, accounted for the second highest number of deaths, claiming 14,606 lives. Western countries struggle with what the opioid cat dragged in: Hard-to-treat opioid addictions, fatal relapses, and needless loss of mainly young lives. Now legislators, first responders, treatment pros, and those in the medical field are forced to focus not on the death toll the cat dragged in, but instead what dragged the cat in.

Keynote Forum

Nachum Dafny

McGovern Medical School, USA

Keynote: Methylphenidate (Ritalin): Attention, Cognitive and Recreational Remedy or Addictive Danger

Time : 11:30 AM to 12:10 PM

Biography:

Nachum Dafny, is a professor in the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy McGovern Medical School at UT Health Houston, Texas.

Abstract:

Methylphenidate (MPD) known as Ritalin is a psychostimulant with pharmacological characteristics similar to those of amphetamine (Amp) and cocaine that are known as drugs that cause dependency and are abused. MPD is used mainly in children and young adults to treat behavioral disorders such as ADHD.  MPD use and abuse has recently increased dramatically by “ordinary” children and young adults as cognitive enhancement to improve academic performance in schools, universities and the work place.  The objective of this study is to test whether MPD can elicit behavioral tolerance, sensitization, withdrawal or cross sensitization with Amp, a drug known to be addictive. Behavioral tolerance, sensitization, withdrawal and cross sensitization with addictive drugs are experimental tools indicating that the drug elicits symptoms associate with physical dependent and are used as a biomarker to indicate that the drug elicits dependent that lead to substance abuse disorder (SUD). Twenty groups of young adult animals each N=12 were used 4 for Amp for control and 16 for MPD and Amp. “Normal” rats (Wistar Kyoto-WKY) and ADHD rat’s model (spontaneous hyperactive rats-SHR) male and female were used.  Upon arrival each rat was placed in their home cages that were used also as test cages for 5-7 days of adaptation to the new environment. Behavioral recording using the open field assay was used for 12 consecutive days as follows: Recording day 1 (RD-1) post saline injection to establish baseline. RD-2 to RD-7 animals was treated either with saline or with 0.6, 2.5, and 10.0 mg/kg MPD, or with 0.6mg/kg Amp followed by three washout days (RD-8 to RD-10) and at RD-11 animals were treated similar to RD-2. At RD 12 all animals expose to 0.6 mg/kg Amp. Saline injection did not alter the animals’ behavior however MPD treatment elicited in WKY rats dose response characteristics of increase in locomotor behavior, as well as, eliciting behavioral withdrawal and sensitization as well as cross sensitization with Amp.  Female rats were more sensitive to the drug as compared to male.  However, the SHR failed to exhibit tolerance, withdrawal, and sensitization or cross sensitization with Amp.  The observation obtained indicated MPD exposure to WKY i.e., normal animals elicits symptoms of SUD, while MPD exposure to ADHD rats (SHR) failed to elicit symptoms of SUD.

  • Pharmacotherapy, Rehabilitation and Risk management | Addiction Science | Treatment Community
Speaker
Biography:

Abdeen Mustafa Omer (BSc, MSc, PhD) is an Associate Researcher at Occupational Health Administration, Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, Khartoum, Sudan. He has been listed in the book WHO’S WHO in the World 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2010. He has published over 300 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 200 review articles, 7 books and 150 chapters in books.

Abstract:

The strategy of price liberalisation and privatisation had been implemented in Sudan over the last decade, and has had a positive result on government deficit. The investment law approved recently has good statements and rules on the above strategy in particular to pharmacy regulations. Under the pressure of the new privatisation policy, the government introduced radical changes in the pharmacy regulations. To improve the effectiveness of the public pharmacy, resources should be switched towards areas of need, reducing inequalities and promoting better health conditions. Medicines are financed either through cost sharing or full private. The role of the private services is significant. A review of reform of financing medicines in Sudan is given in this study. Also, it highlights the current drug supply system in the public sector, which is currently responsibility of the Central Medical Supplies Public Corporation (CMS). In Sudan, the researchers did not identify any rigorous evaluations or quantitative studies about the impact of drug regulations on the quality of medicines and how to protect public health against counterfeit or low quality medicines, although it is practically possible. However, the regulations must be continually evaluated to ensure the public health is protected against by marketing high quality medicines rather than commercial interests, and the drug companies are held accountable for their conduct.

Speaker
Biography:

H. K. Sharma is a Former Senior Research Officer, National Drug dependence Treatment Centre, All India Institute of Medical sciences, New Delhi, India.

Abstract:

Statement of the problem: In Indian context, plant products like raw opium, bhang, ganja and home-brewed alcohol were in use for more than 4000 years in traditional frame work and strong social control mechanism contain the problem. The drug scenario witnessed dramatic change from 1980s onwards. In last few decades, India became a transit point in movement of narcotic/psychotropic substances and the spill over phenomenon saw introduction of potent/ alien substances in different segments of the population. The changing scenario and introduction of pharmaceutical products make the rehabilitation process a daunting task for health care and welfare agencies. The present paper focuses on the concept of rehabilitation and social integration of alcohol/drug dependents as well as modalities, applicability and sustainability in a developing society. Methodology: The presenting author while working with a premier medical Institute in the field of substance use disorder implemented cost effective community-based de-addiction programs among vulnerable groups. Based on experiential accounts of these programs over three decades many key issues emerged and presented here. Conclusion: The experiential accounts reflect that treatment should be geared to a continuum of care including withdrawals management, stabilization and long term recovery-oriented program. The cost factor does not favor establishment of vertical costly Rehabilitation/ after care Centers. In our context, community- based continuum of care through health, social services and economic development programs for vulnerable populations are needed. Efforts must be to encourage community initiatives like community-based rehabilitation centers, develop proper referral systems so that the rural population knows where to avail de-addiction services, establish vocational courses in de-addiction centers as part of the rehabilitation process and ensure effective coordination among various support providers such as Panchayats (local bodies), municipalities, social workers, hospitals or health centers, police etc. to restore normal functioning among the substance abusers.

  • Workshop

Session Introduction

Patrick N. Moore LPC

Duncan Park Press LLC, USA

Title: Perception Development: The Cause of Substance Use Disorders
Speaker
Biography:

Pat is a Licensed Professional Counselor, creator of the Motivational Assessment Prevention Program (MAPP) and author of PREHAB: Leveraging Perception to End Substance Abuse. Pat’s research focuses on the risk continuum for Substance Use Disorders from prevention to treatment. His research uncovered causes and effective education methods for all risk levels as evidenced by reduced negative consequences. His research experience is complemented by his clinical experience with Individual Psychology, Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Myers Briggs Personality Type. Pat is a contributing member and speaker for regional and national conferences.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The prevention paradox (Babor et al., 2010; Kreitman,1986; Rose, 2001) explains tragedies at both ends of the Substance Use Disorder (SUD)  continuum.  The reason is simple.  The cause of SUDs remains hidden.  Through data analysis of college freshmen responses to a new model and assessment, (Moore, 2016), perception development was revealed as the difference between low and high risk students.  Perception development as defined by affective risk response attributes (Ropeik, 2010) is the necessary and sufficient cause of any Substance Use Disorder.  All humans habituate.  The order of attributes determines if habituation results in autonomy or dependence.  In the short term,  intervention before symptom progression and undesirable outcomes is effective as evidenced by MAPP assessment scores. In the long term, on campus alcohol arrests and citations declined 79% from 2013 during the research period 2014-2015 (KSU Annual Security and Fire Safety Report, 2016).   Removal of the cause is the most effective public health policy (Rose, 2001).  Current prevention, treatment and aftercare interventions may cause harm without taking this finding into consideration. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: An elaboration model (Babbie, 2004, p.422) was used for multivariate analysis of evaluation and multiple time-series data based on an empowerment model  and nonequivalent measures.  Students assessed their own risk levels based on the Prehab presentation and MAPP model (Moore, 2016) over time.  The elaboration model isolated the relationship between the primary affective risk response attribute (risk/benefit) and frequency of risk, mental and physical progression and other perception risk factors in convenient samples of first semester college freshmen. Findings: There is a affective risk response pathway common to all students at high or severe risk for Substance Use Disorders. The low risk majority of the sample (75%) use the same perception risk factors in a different order.  Results suggest autonomy or dependence is decided in stage 1 of the MAPP model based on how the perception risk factor control is used  with other perception risk factors at that time. Conclusion & Significance: As evidenced by research measurements and supported by campus outcomes, Substance Use Disorders can be identified and intervened on before symptoms and/or negative consequences.  Likewise, in treatment, cessation is not change.  The assumption that addiction delays development (Harrington, Harris & Wiebe, 2010, p.3) is mistaking correlation for causation.  Perception development of one kind appears as delayed development of another.  The cause remained hidden because there was no measure for it. One type of perception development must stop for another to start. Interventions based on perception development support three new objectives.  Educate the low risk before progression or misinterpretation of others.  Identify and intervene on the high risk before further progression or consequences. Prepare the severe risk for long term change and decrease the detox and die syndrome.  Removing the causal variable through early intervention can end Substance Use Disorders in our time.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Who would know better as to what has best facilitated their recovery from addiction and what may have been detrimental than someone who’s been there? “If you were to create an addiction treatment model, what would it look like?” was the question posed to patients in recovery. Each patient’s background and journey through addiction to recovery will be presented, culminating with their recommendations for a recovery treatment program of their design. Then, deciphering what each proposal had in common, the concepts were distilled down to a collaboratively created addiction treatment strategy which will be outlined in this presentation.

Nesrin Dilbaz

NPISTANBUL Brain Hospital, Turkey

Title: Deep Brain Stimulation in Substance Use Disorders
Speaker
Biography:

Born in 1958. In 1984 he graduated from Anadolu University Faculty of Medicine. The Adult Psychiatric Doctor in 1991. Between 1991-2004, Ankara Numune Hospital was in charge of Psychiatry Expert, Associate Professor, 2nd Psychiatric Clinic Supervisor and lastly Director of AMATEM. She has been managing NPISTANBUL Brain Hospital Addiction Center since 2012.

Abstract:

Brain stimulation therapies play a role in treating certain mental disorders such as depression, psychosis and addiction.  Repetitive transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) first developed in 1985 and in 2008 approved for use of treatment of major depression patients who did not respond to at least one antidepressant in current episode.  The mechanisms of rTMS therapeutic in treating addictions are poorly understood but the recent studies showed the potential of TMS as a cost-effective and tolerable treatment for some Substance use disorders. Drugs of abuse activates the mesolimbic dopamine system that originates from ventral tegmental area and projects to nucleus accumbens, amygdala and hippocampus.  For this reason dopaminergic neurotransmission might serve as a potential target for treating addiction. Recent studies had showed that Insula have a great role in craving.  Deep TMS that can stimulate the deeper areas such as insula and deep prefrontal cortex can be hypothesized as effective in addiction. There are studies about the efficacy of Deep TMS for treatment of smoking. Cocaine and alcohol use disorders. Safe and non-invasive treatment deep transcranial magnetic is used in the treatment of substance use disorders in our clinic.  This randomized open label study aims to evaluate efficacy of Deep TMS among Alcohol and other drug use disordered patients. For alcohol 3 weeks and 5 sessions for each week was the target treatment. For alcohol and nicotine use disorders 3 weeks is the optimal treatment period.

  • Social Support for Addiction

Session Introduction

Joao Angelo Fantini

Federal University of São Carlos, Brazil

Title: Analysis of Treatment and Intervention models on Crack users
Speaker
Biography:

João Angelo Fantini is a Professor in the Federal University of São Carlos/Brazil and Honorary Research Fellow in Birkbeck College. Psychologist and Psychoanalyst, Fantini's research considers the production of subjectivity and symptoms in the psychoanalytic clinic today including social and cultural aspects, especially in recent times, and about the relations between traditional and new media and violence as a result of intolerance against marginalized groups, employing theoretical frameworks derived from Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan. Fantini worked and research with Drug rehabilitation program & centers. Yours recent interests included: intolerance, enthnocentrism, racism, migration, xenophobia, homophobia, prejudice religious and social. Professor Fantini is the author of Roots of Intolerance (Raízes da Intolerância)- Edufscar, 2014; Images of the Father in Cinema: Cultural Clinic (Imagens do Pai no Cinema: clínica da cultura)-Edufscar, 2009, and a number of book chapters and journal articles on Psychoanalysis and contemporary society.

Abstract:

This present study, analyzing the drug addiction phenomena in a Psychoanalytic perspective (Freud/Lacan) and other theories and studies that focus on this phenomena, aims to understand the proposed models as the basis for the care of drug users (specifically crack users). In this perspective, it is intended to present distinctions and common elements in treatment, since the data available is not clear regarding the prevalence of treatment models in Brazil. It is intended, after survey of such data in three types of institution (public, religious and private), to investigate the theories and proposals on which underlie such models as well as implicated mechanisms and treatments. Efforts will be made to reflect on the context of the theories, political views and social characteristics of each model, highlighting the elements that qualify them, so that data and the content of discussions presented provide subsidies to think about the problems relating to drug addiction, making it possible to establish relations between the intervention models and certain social, cultural and related current policies. Thus, by the production of knowledge in the subjective level, it is expected to also be able to provide material for future studies in order to contribute, understand and facilitate practices addressed to the individual drug user, the professionals involved and public and private entities that take care of these programs.

Serah Muindi

Counseling Psychologist, Kenya

Title: Impact of Social Support on Natural Recoveries
Speaker
Biography:

Serah Muindi is a Licensed Counseling Psychologist running a private practice in Kenya, Africa. She holds a Bsc. in Counseling Psychology and Certificate in HIV Testing and Counseling Services. She has experience working with individuals and groups, having provided over 1000 sessions to students and young people in her community. She has grown in experience by handling issues on depression, anxiety, addiction and suicidal tendencies with clients saying ‘their lives have transformed’ because of her help. She recently worked with the Defence Forces in her County to provide therapy for soldiers struggling with PTSD and addiction. She has published several articles on LinkedIn focusing on demystifying counseling and private practice in her country and continent. She is currently working on a Reintegration project for inmates who have completed long term sentences in prison. She loves reading, learning and growing.

Abstract:

Problem statement: Unlike addicts who seek help in rehabilitation centres, natural recoveries simply work on themselves to restore their meaning and purpose and overcome their addictions. Experts and scholars focus on addicts in rehab centres and clinics because of the accuracy in measuring and observing their behavior and changes. This speech looks at the support system of the addict who never walks into a rehab centre nor enrolls for therapy but manages to recover. Researchers have shown that social support for natural recoveries is more internal than external. Methodology and Theoretical Orientation: A comparative study was used in research on addicts who have recovered naturally and through rehabilitation. This speech will showcase the impact of social support by comparing and contrasting the alternatives natural recoveries choose to replace addict associated behavior and support themselves verses the social support structures in rehabilitative institutions. Findings: Native recoveries create new linkages and associate with people who are not addicts for some time and build resilience. They also have discipline and follow through when they vow to quit. Social support for the natural recovery addict is a compliment to their process and not the back bone. They are self aware and quick to find meaning and purpose within themselves. Conclusion and Significance: Social support for natural recoveries provides critical insight about the mind of the addict, insight that will help reinforce social support for recovering addicts who seek help. This speech will trace the recovery process of the natural recovery addict and will highlight the key social support aspects of the same. Understanding the social support of the addict who recovers naturally will be a breakthrough for Addiction science as it will contribute to reduced cases of relapse among addicts.

Speaker
Biography:

Elizabeth Koimett is the Founder of The Serenity Place Foundation comprising of The Serenity place Counselling and Treatment Centres, The Serenity Place Women Rescue and Trauma Centre and The Serenity Place Enterprises. She is the Author of Oxford University Press (East Africa). She is also the Member of IASL and ILA. Liz ia a Motivational Speaker and Certified Professional Mediator (MTI) East Africa Missionary. She did her Honorary PhD in Leadership - University of America Phd (Strategic Management) Moi University.

Abstract:

The female of the species has in many instances been referred to as the weaker sex. This has had severe implications which in most cases culminated in gender based violence, discrimination and harassment.  In some Kenyan Communities, women are regarded as lesser beings that may not even be able to make decisions on their own. This sort of attitude relegates women to a position of helplessness and many resign themselves to a life of slavery.  In almost all such instances, women who are addicted to drugs and alcohol have gone through years of abuse especially in the early stages of their lives. Abuse may in most cases include psychological, sexual, physical and emotional exploitation. lThis leads to a lot of emotional turmoil that later presents in addiction and suicidal tendencies. This is because as they grow older they become unable to handle the shame and the resultant self-hate and may in most cases become isolated, recluse and social misfits. Stephanie Covington (2008), states that ‘a history of being abused increases the likelihood that a woman will abuse alcohol and other drugs. This paper seeks to explore trauma in the light of addiction and justify the need for protection of such women. At the same time the paper will research the Women Integrated Treatment (WIT) model with a view to recommending its use to organizations that have been set up for the sole purpose of rehabilitating and empowering women. The paper will also explore possible theories underlying the Women Integrated Treatment model in order to develop a gender based, holistic treatment for women. The paper will propose specially to the Africans, possible criteria for therapy for women in addiction.